pavise shield

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This page: linen canvas and gesso coating

September 08, 2010: It's been awhile - but we've finally continued working on the pavise after it has been decorating our living room for the last few month... The wooden corpus is now covered tightly with thick, undyed linen. We prepared a not-too-thick dilution of skin glue ('Hasenleim' in german) by soaking the beads in water overnight and carefully heating the stuff to around 60 degrees Celsius. The prepared glue will harden quite fast once the temperature is lowered - best keep it in a baby bottle warmer (quite cheep on your favourite auction website) or in a warm waterbath during use.

We started with a piece of linen roughly the size of the pavise. As the glue hardens quite fast, we found it worked best for us when we glued only small stretches of the pavise at a time (picture 1). After applying the glue, we immediately flattened the linen to the glued surface (picture 2). This works best if you do not apply too much glue - it will otherwise soak through the fabric and stick to your fingers or gloves... After finishing one side of the pavise, we shortened the overhanging linen and glued the excess fabric flat over the edges (picture 3), for sharp angles you will need to cut the fabric (picture 4).

applying the linen coating applying the linen coating
applying the linen coating applying the linen coating

applying the linen coating

We applied the linen first to the back side of the pavise. Before glueing the linen to the front side, we added iron hooks (picture 1) for attachment of the leather strings that will onetime allow us to carry the pavise. Hannes kindly made them for us (he can also forge much more delicate things, such as beautiful and lightweight fencing swords, check his homepage!)
Karsten drilled holes in the corpus (picture 1) - this makes the hammering step (picture 2) easier and keeps the wood from splintering - and hollowed out the front (picture 3) to keep the ends of the hooks from sticking out. As a space holder, we used a piece of thick leather when hammering in the hooks. We removed the leather (picture 4) after flattening the protruding ends of the hook on the front side of the pavise (picture 3). Thanks to the space holder, there remains some space for attachment of leather straps on the back side of the pavise (picture 5).

attachments for leather straps attachments for leather straps attachments for leather straps
attachments for leather straps attachments for leather straps

iron hooks for attachment of leather carrying straps

On the front side of the pavise, we started glueing linen to the 'protruding ridge' and continued with the sides (picture 1). If you pull the glue-soaked linen, you can nicely wrap it around obstacles like the pavise's 'nose', making it lie flat to the surface of the wood without cutting the fabric (picture 2-4).

applying the lien coating applying the linen coating
applying the linen coating applying the linen coating

applying the linen coating to the 'nose'

Unfortunately, the linen-coated pavise seemed to provide a too attractive target for our cat's claw-sharpening attempts... Thus, we have to hide it in the basement until the gesso is applied and the surface turns less interesting.

pavise with Flecki

Flecki took a liking to the pavise...

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